Jobs’s desire to control the user experience had been at the heart

Jobs’s desire to control the user experience had been at the heart of his debate with

Wozniak over whether the Apple II would have slots that allow a user to plug expansion

cards into a computer’s motherboard and thus add some new functionality. Wozniak won

 

 

that argument: The Apple II had eight slots. But this time around it would be Jobs’s machine, not

Wozniak’s, and the Macintosh would have limited slots. You wouldn’t even be able to open

the case and get to the motherboard. For a hobbyist or hacker, that was uncool. But for Jobs, the

Macintosh was for the masses. He wanted to give them a controlled experience.

 

a philosophical component, one that was related to his penchant for

control. He believed that for a computer to be truly great, its hardware

and its software had to be tightly linked. When a computer was open

to running software that also worked on other computers, it would end

up sacrificing some functionality. The best products, he believed, were

“whole widgets” that were designed end-to-end, with the software closely

tailored to the hardware and vice versa. This is what would distinguish the

Macintosh, which had an operating system that worked only on its own

hardware, from the environment that Microsoft was creating, in which its

operating system could be used on hardware made by many different companies.

“Jobs is a strong-willed, elitist artist who doesn’t want his creations mutated

inauspiciously by unworthy programmers,” explained ZDNet’s editor

Dan Farber. “It would be as if someone off the street added some

brush strokes to a Picasso painting or changed the lyrics to a Dylan song.”

In later years Jobs’s whole-widget approach would distinguish the iPhone,

iPod, and iPad from their competitors. It resulted in awesome products.

But it was not always the best strategy for dominating a market. “

From the first Mac to the latest iPhone, Jobs’s systems have always

been sealed shut to prevent consumers

 

from meddling and

modifyingthem,”

noted Leander Kahney,

author of Cult of the Mac.

www.sh419bb.com